Thank You!
Your request for service has been received.
One of our service specialist will be contacting you within 24 hours. A copy has also been sent to the email address you provided.

INTERACTIVE KNOWLEDGE BASE

PRESS ON SUBJECTS TO LEARN MORE

Controls & Safety

a.

Ease of use and connectivity to external devices, industry 4.0

THE FUTURE OF PRESS CONTROL TECHNOLOGY

SAFETY - CONNECTIVITY - FLEXIBILITY

Sutherland is proud to introduce I-PRESS®, the future of press control technology. With software based controls and touchscreen displays, I-PRESS® represents our commitment to leading the industry with the latest in controls innovation. The metal forming industry is evolving to a new level of connectivity and automation, and I-PRESS® has been designed to bring your press operations into the 21st century.

  • The world’s most intuitive press control
  • Full suite of safety features
  • Built for automation and expandability
  • Designed to integrate seamlessly with Connected Enterprise

I-PRESS CONTROLS YOUR PRESS ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD
ACCESS YOUR PRESS PRODUCTION FROM ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

I-PRESS® is built for customization and expandability. When new features or modifications are needed, there are no costly chip replacements, just unlock your upgrades directly from the software.

• Full suite of automation tools
• Easy integration with feeders, robots, and transfer systems
• Customizable to support special applications

b.

Main Run Screen Mechanical

MAIN RUN SCREEN (SCREEN 4.1)

MAIN RUN SCREEN

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. STROKE POSITION & ANGLE INDICATOR & ACTUAL SPEED: This angle should be the same as mechanical clock type indicator on Press crown. Angle is shown based on the electronic encoder which monitors slide position & overrun position. Encoder Position can be re-calibrated, see “re-zero encoder”. Actual speed shows current SPM / strokes per minute.

3. OK MONITOR: Green display shows that all systems are functioning and no faults are present.

4. FAULT MONITOR: When any safety or machine fault is present, the fault will display in yellow and OK monitor will no longer be Green. Fault needs to be resolved and “reset button” at t-stand needs to be pressed to clear fault.

5. JOB BUTTON: Press this to go to “job memory” screen. This is where a new job can be loaded. From this location you can also Go to “job library” screen to pull up jobs that have been saved.

6. JOB NUMBER: 10 digit alpha-numeric job names can be assigned on “job memory” set up screen.

7. SPM: Displays current SPM/ strokes per minute speed setting of main motor, flywheel and slide motion. This is adjusted up/down by tapping field and entering a desired strokes per minute value.

8. MODE: field displays 5 different modes of operation, “off, inch, single stroke, continuous, special” modes. To start main motor, mode selector switch located in t-stand must be in the “off” position. “special mode” can only be accessed with Supervisor level password.

9. MAIN MOTOR DIRECTION: Displays 3 positions of motor direction key selector at mos / master operation station: “forward, flywheel brake, reverse”

Note: press will only operate in “inch mode” when in reverse. When middle position / flywheel brake is selected this will activate brake, stop slide movement, turn off main motor and apply flywheel brake.

10. AMP: displays main motor amp draw. This can be helpful when setting acb / air counter balance air pressure which equalizes upper die weight. Minimal fluctuation of amps indicate proper setting of acb pressure. If amps go up during 180 to 359 upstroke this indicates acb pressure may be to low. If amps go up during 0 to 180 down stroke indicates acb pressure may be too high.

11. CAM BUTTON: Press to go to programmable cam screen. Cams 1-12 are pre-wired on terminal strips in lower section of mep / main electrical panel.

12. DIE PROTECTION: Press to go to “die protection” screen. Die pro 1-16 are pre-wired on terminal strips in lower section of mep / main electrical panel.

13. STOP TIME: Displays stopping time in ms / milliseconds every stroke. Parameter settings are accessible with supervisor password.

14. BRAKE SLIP: Displays slip angle. Parameter settings are accessible with supervisor password.

15. CLUTCH TIME Displays clutch engagement time in ms / milliseconds. Parameter settings are accessible with supervisor password.

16. TONNAGE: Press to go to tonnage screen, field below shows total tonnage during each stroke of the press.

17. MIN TONNAGE: Displays red indicator if min tonnage setting on job memory screen goes below a preset limit. Slide will stop at tdc / top dead center and hmi will display “min tonnage” fault at upper right on main run screen. Press “reset button” at t-stand to clear fault.

18. MAX TONNAGE: Displays red indicator if max tonnage setting on job memory screen goes above a preset limit. Slide will stop at tdc / top dead center and hmi will display “max tonnage” fault at upper right on main run screen. Press “reset button” at t-stand to clear fault.

19. SPECIAL MODE OF OPERATIONS: Optional, accessible with supervisor password. This allows 4 settings, “normal operations mode-micro inch, ssd / single stroke on demand, csd / continuous stroke on demand” this is ideal for presses that are slaved to upstream or downstream automation.

20. COUNTERS: Press to go to counters screen where you can adjust the counter values.

21. PRESET COUNTER 1: Displays preset 1 counter on counter screen. This can be used as a batch counter.

22. CURRENT COUNT 1: Displays the current count from when counter was started. When this reaches same number as preset 1, slide will stop at tdc and green OK monitor will go off and will display “preset 1 count” fault at upper right on main run screen. Go to counter screen to re-zero or set new value.

23. MAINTENANCE STOP: Displays countdown to maintenance stop. Green OK monitor will go off and will display “maintenance count” fault at upper right on main run screen. Supervisor password is required to clear or reset maintenance counter. Then press “reset button” at t-stand to clear fault.

Note: When counters (#21 & #22 & #23) reaches 80% of its preset value, it will turn yellow. When it reaches 90% of its preset value it will turn red. This is so that the operator can be prepared for the press to stop.

• Option 1: BAR-CODE SCANNER: Press to use the bar-code scanner and automatically load a preset job linked to that bar-code.

• Option 2: STROKE SEQUENCE COUNTER: Displays customizable stroke counter.

• Option 3: QDC: Press to go to quick die change screen in order to operate die clamps and die lifters.

• Option 4: AUTO DIE HEIGHT: Displays die height in mm or inches. Can be programmed in job memory to eliminate operators use of the manual die height adjustment.

• Option 5: CONTINUOUS RUN TIME: Displays how long the press has been running in continuous mode.

c.

Main Run Screen Servo Hydraulic

MAIN RUN SCREEN (SCREEN 4)

MAIN RUN SCREEN HYDRAULIC
HYDRAULIC PRESS MAIN RUN SCREEN

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. OK MONITOR: Green "OK" display shows that all systems are functioning and no faults are present. Red 'fault' displays indicates there is a fault present and the press will not operate.

3. JOB BUTTON: Press this to go to “job memory” screen. This is where a new job can be loaded. From this location you can also go to “job library” screen to pull up jobs that have been saved.

4. JOB NUMBER: 10 digit alpha-numeric job names can be assigned on “job memory” set up screen.

5. MODE: Field displays 5 different modes of operation, “off, inch, single stroke, continuous, special” modes. To start main motor, mode selector switch located in t-stand must be in the “off” position. “special mode” can only be accessed with supervisor level password.

6. SLIDE LOCK-'NOT FULLY ENGAGED': Shows this fault when the slide locks are not fully engaged. When slide locks are retracted all the way, this field will show "Released" in green. See next page.

7. CUSHION MODE: Toggle between off, simultaneously or delay. In simultaneously mode, the cushion will rise as soon as the ram start rising after reaching bdc. In delay mode, the cushion will rise with a set amount of delay time, after ram start rising from bdc.

8. CAM BUTTON: Press to go to programmable cam screen. Cams 1-12 are prewired on terminal strips in lower section of mep / main electrical panel.

9. DIE MONITORING: Press to go to “die monitoring” screen. Die pro 1-16 are prewired on terminal strips in lower section of mep / main electrical panel.

10. STROKE POSITION & STROKE STAGE INDICATOR: Position of slide shown is based on the linear transducer which monitors slide position.

11. SLIDE POSITION: Displays current slide position in mm.

12. CUSHION POSITION: Displays current cushion position in mm.

13. STOP TIME: Displays stopping time in ms / milliseconds every stroke. Parameter settings are accessible with supervisor password.

14. CYCLE TIME: Displays the total cycle time in seconds.

15. OIL TEMP: Displays oil temp in Fahrenheit .

16. SLIDE PRESSURE - LIVE: This field displays current slide pressure (tonnage) at any given moment.

17. SLIDE PRESSURE - PEAK: This field displays the highest pressure value from the last stroke.

18. CUSHION PRESSURE: Displays cushion pressure.

19. COUNTERS: Press to go to counters screen where you can adjust the counter values

20. PRESET COUNTER 1: Displays preset 1 counter on counter screen. This can be used as a batch counter.

21. CURRENT COUNT 1: Displays the current count from when counter was started. When this reaches same number as preset 1, slide will stop at tdc and green OK monitor will go off and will display “preset 1 count” fault at upper right on main run screen. Go to counter screen to re-zero or set new value.

22. MAINTENANCE STOP: Displays countdown to maintenance stop. Green OK monitor will go off and will display “maintenance count” fault at upper right on main run screen. Supervisor password is required to clear or reset maintenance counter.

d.

Main Run Screen Forge

MAIN RUN SCREEN (SCREEN 4.1)

MAIN RUN SCREEN FORGE PRESS

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. STROKE POSITION & ANGLE INDICATOR & ACTUAL SPEED: This angle should be the same as mechanical clock type indicator on press crown. Angle is shown based on the electronic encoder which monitors slide position & overrun position. Encoder position can be re-calibrated, see “re-zero encoder”. Actual speed shows current SPM / strokes per minute.

3. OK MONITOR: Green display shows that all systems are functioning and no faults are present. When any safety or machine fault is present, the fault will display in the yellow area and ok monitor will no longer be green. Fault needs to be resolved and “reset button” at t-stand needs to be pressed to clear fault.

4. JOB BUTTON: Press this to go to “job memory” screen. This is where a new job can be loaded. From this location you can also go to “job library” screen to pull up jobs that have been saved.

5. JOB NUMBER: 10 digit alpha-numeric job names can be assigned on “job memory” set up screen.

6. MOTOR RPM: Displays current motor rpm / rotations per minute speed setting of main motor.

7. MODE: Field displays 5 different modes of operation, “off, inch, single stroke, continuous, special” modes. To start main motor, mode selector switch located in t-stand must be in the “off” position. “special mode” can only be accessed with supervisor level password.

8. MAIN MOTOR DIRECTION: Displays 3 positions of motor direction key selector at mos / master operation station: “forward, flywheel brake, reverse” note: press will only operate in “inch mode” when in reverse. When middle position / flywheel brake is selected this will activate brake, stop slide movement, turn off main motor and apply flywheel brake.

9. AMP: Displays main motor amp draw. This can be helpful when setting acb / air counter balance air pressure which equalizes upper die weight. Minimal fluctuation of amps indicate proper setting of acb pressure. If amps go up during 180 to 359 upstroke this indicates acb pressure may be to low. If amps go up during 0 to 180 down stroke indicates acb pressure may be too high.

10. CAMS BUTTON: Press to go to programmable cam screen. Cams 1-12 are pre-wired on terminal strips in lower section of mep / main electrical panel.

11. DIE MONITORING: Press to go to “die protection” screen. Die pro 1-16 are pre-wired on terminal strips in lower section of mep / main electrical panel.

12. STOP TIME: Displays stopping time in ms / milliseconds every stroke. Parameter settings are accessible with supervisor password.

13. BRAKE SLIP: Displays slip angle. Parameter settings are accessible with supervisor password.

14. CLUTCH TIME: Displays clutch engagement time in ms / milliseconds. Parameter settings are accessible with supervisor password.

15. SLIDE ADJUST: Displays current die height.

16. MIN/MAX INDICATORS: Will display a red indicator if the die height reaches the physical min die height limit.

17. TONNAGE: Press to go to tonnage screen, field below shows total tonnage during each stroke of the press.

18. MIN/MAX INDICATORS: Displays red indicator if min tonnage setting on job memory screen goes below a preset limit. Slide will stop at tdc / top dead center and hmi will display “min tonnage” fault at upper right on main run screen. Press “reset button” at t-stand to clear fault.

19. SPECIAL MODE OF OPERATIONS: Optional, accessible with supervisor password. This allows 4 settings, “normal operations mode-micro inch, ssd / single stroke on demand, csd / continuous stroke on demand” this is ideal for presses that are slaved to upstream or downstream automation.

20. COUNTERS: Press to go to counters screen where you can adjust the counter values

21. PRESET COUNTER 1: Displays preset 1 counter on counter screen. This can be used as a batch counter.

22. CURRENT COUNT 1: Displays the current count from when counter was started. When this reaches same number as preset 1, slide will stop at tdc and green ok monitor will go off and will display “preset 1 count” fault at upper right on main run screen. Go to counter screen to re-zero or set new value.

23. MAINTENANCE STOP: Displays countdown to maintenance stop. Green ok monitor will go off and will display “maintenance count” fault at upper right on main run screen. Supervisor password is required to clear or reset maintenance counter. Then press “reset button” at t-stand to clear fault.

24. VARIOUS TEMP INDICATORS: This area allows you to monitor the temperature in different areas of the press. These fields will turn red if the temp rises over a set limit.

Note:

When counters (#21 & #22 & #23) reaches 80% of its preset value, it will turn yellow. When it reaches 90% of its preset value it will turn red. This is so that the operator can be prepared for the press to stop.

e.

Color Touch Screen Navigation

NAVIGATION SCREEN / LEVEL 1 OPERATOR (SCREEN 5)

NAVIGATION SCREEN / LEVEL 1 OPERATOR

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. ADMIN PASSWORD: Press to allow supervisor or higher password to be entered. Return to lower level password, use logout button.

3. LOGOUT: This allows users to logout so others can login with their password level.

4. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

5. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

6. JOB MEMORY: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

7. CAMS PROGRAMMABLE: Press to go to “programmable cams” screen.

8. DIE MONITORING: Press to go to “die monitoring” screen.

9. TONNAGE: Press to go to “tonnage monitor” screen.

10. NETWORK CONFIGURATION: Shows plc type and safety I/o modules.

11. JOB LIBRARY: Press to go to “job library screen” to select a pre-programmed job or enter a new job.

12. CAM STATUS: Press to go to cam status screen. (view only)

13. DIE MONITORING STATUS: Press to go to die monitoring screen. (view only)

14. COUNTER: Press to go to “counter screen” “preset 1, preset 2, cut counter 1, cut counter 2, maintenance & total life counter”.

15. ABOUT PRESS: Press to see press specifications & I-press control manual.

16. PLC INPUT MONITOR: Press to go to “plc-1 inputs monitor” screen, great for trouble shooting.

17. PLC OUTPUT MONITOR: Press to go to “plc-1 outputs monitor” screen, great for trouble shooting.

18. SAFETY POINT I/O MONITOR: Press to view I/O status of the plc.

19. **optional** COIL FEED CONTROL: Coil feed control through I-press hmi.

20. **optional** EXIT CONVEYOR STATUS: Exit conveyor control through I-press hmi.

21. FAULT HISTORY: Press to go to “fault history” screen.

22. FAULT DIAGNOSTICS: Press to go to “fault diagnostics” screen.

23. FAULT LIBRARY: Press to go to fault library.

24. QUICK DIE CHANGE: Press to go to QDC screen where you can control your die clamps / lifter.

25. SCROLL RIGHT: Press to go to level 2 operator screen.

f.

Cams Programmable & Nameable Mechanical & Forge

CAMS PROGRAMMABLE (SCREEN 7)

CAMS PROGRAMMABLE

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen. You have arrived.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. UPDATE JOB: After you have set the cams best suited for the job, press save update job button and then return to job memory Screen.

5. RETURN TO JOB MEMORY: Press blue hot key to return to job memory screen. Once there you can then go on to die monitoring, tonnage & counter screens to complete your job set up and save the job. (follow instructions on job memory screen on the steps for setting up a new job)

6. CAM NAME: Cam 1 is fixed to air ejector system, cams 2-12 can be named as needed when you wire in your automation or feed lines.

7. CAM NUMBER: Displays the cam number.

8. SWITCH: Is a toggle button to turn cams on/off.

9. CAM/CUT/DWELL: Any cam can be selected to be either cam, cut or dwell. In cam mode, you can select the on and off angles for the cam to fire during each stroke. In cut mode, you can set the on and off angles for the cam to fire as well as a stroke interval with a preset value. In dwell mode, you can set a delay time for the cam to fire.

10. ON ANGLE: Press here to enter the angle for the device / signal to come on.

11. OFF ANGLE: Press here to enter the angle for the the device / signal to come off.

12. PRESET COUNT: Press here to set the number of strokes interval for the cam to fire.

13. ACTUAL COUNT: This number will increase with each stroke until reaching the preset value (preset count - #12). Once the preset value has reached, the selected cam will turn on and the actual count display will reset back to 0.

14. DWELL TIME: When cam is set to dwell mode (#9 = dwell) press here to set the delay time in seconds for this cam to turn on. Cam will only activate after dwell time count down is complete. Should only be used in single stroke mode.

Note:

• If you need more cams, use the scroll arrow to access cam 4-12.

• Now that you have set up your cams, press save job to return to job memory screen.

• Your mep / main electrical panel has been pre-wired with terminal blocks with 5 amp relays to tie in your automation. In most cases these are in the lower section of your mep, located next to other field accessible terminal blocks for die monitoring, e-stop, cycle stop & top stop.

g.

Cams Programmable & Nameable Servo Hydraulic

CAMS PROGRAMMABLE (SCREEN 7)

cams programmable hydraulic

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, More or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen. You have arrived.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. UPDATE RECIPE: After you have set the cams best suited for the job, press update recipe button and then return to job memory Screen.

5. CAM NUMBER: Displays cam's circuit number.

6. CAM NAME: Displays the current cam name.

7. SWITCH: Is a toggle button to turn cams on/off.

8. UP/DOWN ON POSITION: Toggle between up or down to change the part of the stroke in which the cam will turn on.

9. ON POSITION: Position for the cam to turn on in inches from tdc.

10. UP/DOWN OFF POSITION: You can enter the position that you want the device / signal to come on.

11. OFF POSITION: Position for the cam to turn off in inches from tdc (total length of stroke up to this point).

12. DOWN PART OF THE STROKE: This yellow-red line represents the 'down' part of the stroke. Adjust cam on/off position by sliding Your finger to the desired position.

13. UP PART OF THE STROKE: This green line represents the 'up' part of the stroke. Adjust cam on/off position by sliding your finger. To the desired position.

14. SCROLL: Press to scroll to next cam

h.

Die Monitors Programmable & Nameable Mechanical & Forge

DIE MONITORING 1-16 (SCREEN 8.1)

Die Monitoring

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen. You have arrived.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. UPDATE JOB: After you have set the dm 1 to 16 best suited for the job, and then press return to job memory screen.

5. RETURN TO JOB MEMORY: Press blue hot key to return to job memory screen. Once there you can then go on to cams, tonnage & counter screen to complete your job set up and save it. (Follow instructions on job memory screen on the steps for setting up a new job)

6. DIE MONITORING CIRCUIT NAME: Die monitors 1 to 16 can be named as needed when you wire in die monitor sensors.

7. SWITCH: Is a toggle button to turn die monitors on/off.

8. MODE: Allows you to toggle between contact or cyclic depending on the type of sensor in use. When in cyclic mode, the sensor will look for two state changes (from on to off and then off to on) during the stroke part specified by the on/off angles. If two state changes are not detected, the press will fault. When in contact mode, the sensor will look for one state change during the stroke part specified by the on/off angles. If no state change or more than one state change is detected, the press will fault. See pages 27-28 for more detailed explanation.

9. TYPE: Allows you to toggle between n/c normally closed or n/o normally open circuits depending on the type of sensor in use.

10. STOP: Allows you to toggle between top stop and cycle stop. Cycle stop is like e-stop but leaves all motors in running condition.

11. ON ANGLE: You can enter the angle that you want the device / signal to turn on.

Note:

• Now that you have set up your die monitoring, press save job return to job memory screen.

• Your mep / main electrical panel has been pre-wired with 16 terminal blocks for die monitoring. In most cases these are in the lower section of your mep, located next to other field accessible terminal blocks for programmable cams, e-stop, cycle stop & top stop.

cyclic mode screen
CYCLIC MODE
CONTACT MODE
CONTACT MODE

i.

Die Monitors Programmable & Nameable Servo Hydraulic

DIE MONITORING 1-16 (SCREEN 8.1)

DIE MONITORING screen
DIE MONITORING SCREEN 2

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, More or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen. You have arrived.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected. -

4. UPDATE RECIPE: After you have set the dm 1 to 16 best suited for the job, and then press return to job memory screen.

5. DIE MONITORING CIRCUIT NUMBER: Displays the number of currently displayed die protection / monitoring circuit.

6. NAME: Die monitors 1 to 16 can be named as needed when you wire in die monitor sensors.

7. SWITCH: Is a toggle button to turn die monitors on/off

8. DOWN/UP ON POSITION: Toggle between up or down to change the part of the stroke in which the die pro. Will turn on.

9. ON POSITION: Position for the die pro. To turn on in inches from tdc.

10. DOWN/UP ON POSITION: Toggle between up or down to change the part of the stroke in which the die pro. Will turn off.

11. OFF POSITION: position for the die pro. To turn on in inches from tdc (total length of stroke up to this point).

12. MODE: allows you to toggle between contact or cyclic depending on the type of sensor in use.

13. TYPE: Allows you to toggle between n/c (normally closed) or n/o (normally open) circuits depending on the type of sensor In use.

14. STOP: Allows you to toggle between top stop and cycle stop. Cycle stop is like e-stop but leaves all motors in running Condition.

15. ON/OFF POSITION SLIDERS: This is where both the on and off position sliders will appear when programming a new die pro. circuit. Slide each one to the desired location. See screen 8.2 #20 & #21 for another view.

16. DOWN PART OF THE STROKE: This yellow-red line represents the 'down' part of the stroke. Adjust cam on/off position by sliding your finger to the desired position.

17. UP PART OF THE STROKE: This green line represents the 'up' part of the stroke. Adjust cam on/off position by sliding your finger to the desired position.

18. SCROLL LEFT: Scroll left.

19. SCROLL RIGHT: Scroll right.

Note:

• Now that you have set up your die monitoring, press update recipe to return to job memory screen.

• Your mep / main electrical panel has been pre-wired with 16 terminal blocks for die monitoring. In most cases these are in the lower section of your mep, located next to other field accessible terminal blocks for programmable cams, e-stop, cycle stop & top stop.

j.

Tonnage Monitor Mechanical

TONNAGE MONITOR (SCREEN 9)

TONNAGE MONITOR

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. UPDATE JOB: After you have set the high & low tonnage alarms best suited for the job, press job button.

5. RETURN TO JOB MEMORY: Press blue hot key to return to job memory screen. Once there you can then go on to cams, die monitors & counter screen to complete your job set up and make final save. (follow instructions on job memory screen on the steps for setting up a new job)

6. LEFT REAR: Displays tonnage load from left rear frame mounted strain link.

7. TOTAL: Displays total forward tonnage of each stroke.

8. RIGHT REAR: Displays tonnage load from right rear frame mounted strain link.

9. LEFT FRONT: Displays tonnage load from left front frame mounted strain link.

10. REVERSE: Displays reverse snap-through tonnage. (we recommend not exceeding more that 10% press capacity in reverse tonnage)

CAUTION: Keep tonnage load distributed as evenly as possible to prevent damage to press.

WARNING: Reverse tonnage of greater than 10% of press capacity will damage your press over time. Die modifications or the addition of punching dampers are recommended.

Note:

• Description applies for both 2-point and 4-point tonnage monitors.

• High & low tonnage limits can be customized for each job in the tonnage screen accessible from the main run screen or the operator level 1 navigation screen. If tonnage goes below or above the high & low levels, press will stop and fault will show on main run screen.

• Level your load. Off center loads are best to be avoided as this can cause uneven wear to your press slide guidance and drive components.

k.

Tonnage Monitor / Pressure Setting Servo Hydraulic

SINGLE POINT SETUP (SCREEN 10)

SINGLE POINT SETUP

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. CHANGE PRESS MODE: Toggle between pressure and position. Pressure mode will make sure your pressure will reach the desired value, and position mode will make sure your position marker is reached regardless of the tonnage.

3. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen. You have arrived.

4. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

5. OK MONITOR: Green display shows that all systems are functioning and no faults are present.

6. UPDATE RECIPE: After you have set the dm 1 to 16 best suited for the job, and then press return to job memory screen.

7. CYCLE TIME: Displays the total cycle time in seconds.

8. TOGGLE % / IPM: This button toggles between '%' and "Ipm". This will change the way the speed of each part of the stroke is Being displayed (#16). '%' = percentage out of max speed - max speed is different for each part of the cycle - change to ipm for More accuracy or refer to machine specs. Ipm = inch per minute.

9. FA: Fast approach is used to move the ram at maximum speed from tdc towards bdc before hitting the material.

10. SA: Slow approach - once close to the material, use slow approach for the last couple of inches of the approach before Touching the material.

11. FP1: Fast press 1 is for when the ram comes in contact with the material. Speed of press can be changed to desired value.

12. SP1: Slow press 1 is used for the last part of the downwards stroke for a more accurate and gentle stop.

13. DW: Dwell time is used when you need a dwelling period at the bottom of the stroke.

14. SU: Slow up is used for the initial slow movement upwards after the material has been pressed.

15. FU: Fast up is used to reach tdc at high speed to minimize cycle time.

16. ST: Slow top is used for the last part of the stroke just before tdc.

17. SPEED DISPLAY: This is where the speed of each part of the stroke is displayed.

18. TOP: Press here to programmable your top set point. After pressing, you can set by current position or by entering a distance in Inches from tdc. Red position bar moves according to ram position.

19. BOTTOM: Press here to programmable your bottom set point. After pressing, you can set by current position or by entering a Distance in inches from tdc. Red position bar moves according to ram position.

MULTI POINT SETUP (SCREEN 9.1)

MULTI POINT SETUP 1
MULTI POINT SETUP 2
MULTI POINT SETUP 3

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

5. OK MONITOR: Green display shows that all systems are functioning and no faults are present.

6. UPDATE RECIPE: After you have set the dm 1 to 16 best suited for the job, and then press return to job memory screen.

7. CYCLE TIME: Displays the total cycle time in seconds.

8. TOGGLE % / IPM: This button toggles between '%' and "Ipm". This will change the way the speed of each part of the stroke is being displayed. '%' = percentage out of max speed - max speed is different for each part of the cycle - change to ipm for better accuracy or refer to machine specs. Ipm = inch per minute. See screen 9.2- #23 & #24 for more details.

9. FA: Fast approach is used to move the ram at maximum speed from tdc towards bdc before hitting the material.

10. SA: Slow approach - once close to the material, use slow approach for the last couple of inches of the approach before touching the material.

11. FP1: Fast press 1 - is when the ram comes in contact with the material. Speed of press can be changed to desired value.

12. FP2: Fast press 2 - use this cycle if you'd like to press at a different speed than fp1.

13. FP3: Fast press 3 - use this cycle if you'd like to press at a different speed than fp2.

14. SP1: Slow press 1- is used for the last part of the downwards stroke for a more accurate and gentle stop.

15. SP2: Slow press 2 - use this cycle if you'd like to slow press at a different speed than sp1.

16. SP3: Slow press 3 - use this cycle if you'd like to slow press at a different speed than sp2

17. SP4: Slow press 4 - use this cycle if you'd like to slow press at a different speed than sp3

18. DW: Dwell time is used when you need a dwelling period at the bottom of the stroke.

19. SU: Slow up is used for the initial slow movement upwards after the material has been pressed.

20. FU: Fast up is used to reach tdc at high speed to minimize cycle time.

21. ST: Slow top is used for the last part of the stroke just before tdc.

22. TOP: Press here to programmable your top set point. After pressing, you can set by current position or by entering a distance in inches from tdc. Red position bar moves according to ram position.

23. BOTTOM: Press here to programmable your bottom set point. After pressing, you can set by current position or by entering a distance in inches from tdc. Red position bar moves according to ram position.

24. INDIVIDUAL STROKE LENGTH: This number is how many inches from tdc is each part of the stroke.

25. IPM \ INCH PER MINUTE: When IPM is displayed the speed of each part of the stroke will be displayed in IPM.

26. SPEED DISPLAY: This is where the speed for each part of the stroke is displayed.

27. PRESS MODE CHANGE POP UP: This message is a safety step the operator must take in order to change the mode of the press.

l.

Job Memory / Faster Set Ups Mechanical

JOB LIBRARY (SCREEN 11)

JOB LIBRARY

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, More or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. LOAD: After selecting the desired job, press here to load the job to the press. This will change the cams, die monitoring circuits, SPM and all other job related parameters.

5. DELETE: After selecting the desired job, press here to delete a job.

6. COPY: After selecting the desired job, press here to copy a job. This is very helpful if you only want to make small changes I an existing job.

7. PASTE: After coping a job, press here to paste it to a new spot in the job library.

8. JOB NAME: Display of all the names of saved jobs.

9. DATE RUN: Display of the last date the job ran.

m.

Job Memory / Single Point Edit Servo Hydraulic

SINGLE POINT SETUP (SCREEN 10)

JOB MEMORY SINGLE POINT HYDRAULIC PRESS

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, More or less screens are accessible.

2. CHANGE PASS MODE: Toggle between pressure and position. Pressure mode will make sure your pressure will reach the desired value, and position mode will make sure your position marker is reached regardless of the tonnage.

3. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen. You have arrived.

4. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected. -

5. OK MONITOR: Green display shows that all systems are functioning and no faults are present

6. UPDATE RECIPE: After you have set the dm 1 to 16 best suited for the job, and then press return to job memory screen.

7. CYCLE TIME: Displays the total cycle time in seconds.

8. TOGGLE % / IPM: This button toggles between '%' and "IPM". This will change the way the speed of each part of the stroke is Being displayed (#16). '%' = percentage out of max speed - max speed is different for each part of the cycle - change to IPM for More accuracy or refer to machine specs. IPM = inch per minute.

9. FA: Fast approach is used to move the ram at maximum speed from tdc towards BDC before hitting the material.

10. SA: Slow approach - once close to the material, use slow approach for the last couple of inches of the approach before Touching the material.

11. FP1: Fast press 1 is for when the ram comes in contact with the material. Speed of press can be changed to desired value.

12. SP1: Slow press 1 is used for the last part of the downwards stroke for a more accurate and gentle stop.

13. DW: Dwell time is used when you need a dwelling period at the bottom of the stroke.

14. SU: Slow up is used for the initial slow movement upwards after the material has been pressed.

15. FU: Fast up is used to reach tdc at high speed to minimize cycle time.

16. ST: Slow top is used for the last part of the stroke just before tdc.

17. SPEED DISPLAY: This is where the speed of each part of the stroke is displayed.

18. TOP: Press here to programmable your top set point. After pressing, you can set by current position or by entering a distance in Inches from tdc. Red position bar moves according to ram position.

19. BOTTOM: Press here to programmable your bottom set point. After pressing, you can set by current position or by entering a Distance in inches from tdc. Red position bar moves according to ram position.

n.

Performance Monitor / Single Point Edit Servo hydraulic

PERFORMANCE SINGLE-POINT (SCREEN 17.2)

PERFORMANCE SINGLE-POINT HYDRAULIC

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. DISTANCE: Displays the distance in inches of each part of the stroke.

5. TIME: Displays the time in seconds of each part of the stroke.

6. TOTAL TIME: Displays total cycle time in seconds.

7. TOTAL DISTANCE: Displays total stroke length in inches.

THIS PAGE IS GREAT FOR CYCLE TIME OPTIMIZATION. IT ALLOWS VIEWING EACH MOTION SECTION OF THE CYCLE "LIVE" AND CHANGING VALUES TO REACH MAXIMUM OUTPUT.

o.

Single Point Edit Screen-Performance Monitor-Valve Sequence Video

SERVO HYDRAULICS & I-PRESS® CONTROLS


p.

Job Memory / Multi Point Edit Servo Hydraulic

MULTI POINT SETUP (SCREEN 9.1)

MULTI POINT SETUP 1
MULTI POINT SETUP 2
MULTI POINT SETUP 3

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

5. OK MONITOR: Green display shows that all systems are functioning and no faults are present.

6. UPDATE RECIPE: After you have set the dm 1 to 16 best suited for the job, and then press return to job memory screen.

7. CYCLE TIME: Displays the total cycle time in seconds.

8. TOGGLE % / IPM: This button toggles between '%' and "Ipm". This will change the way the speed of each part of the stroke is being displayed. '%' = percentage out of max speed - max speed is different for each part of the cycle - change to ipm for better accuracy or refer to machine specs. Ipm = inch per minute. See screen 9.2- #23 & #24 for more details.

9. FA: Fast approach is used to move the ram at maximum speed from tdc towards bdc before hitting the material.

10. SA: Slow approach - once close to the material, use slow approach for the last couple of inches of the approach before touching the material.

11. FP1: Fast press 1 - is when the ram comes in contact with the material. Speed of press can be changed to desired value.

12. FP2: Fast press 2 - use this cycle if you'd like to press at a different speed than fp1.

13. FP3: Fast press 3 - use this cycle if you'd like to press at a different speed than fp2.

14. SP1: Slow press 1- is used for the last part of the downwards stroke for a more accurate and gentle stop.

15. SP2: Slow press 2 - use this cycle if you'd like to slow press at a different speed than sp1.

16. SP3: Slow press 3 - use this cycle if you'd like to slow press at a different speed than sp2

17. SP4: Slow press 4 - use this cycle if you'd like to slow press at a different speed than sp3

18. DW: Dwell time is used when you need a dwelling period at the bottom of the stroke.

19. SU: Slow up is used for the initial slow movement upwards after the material has been pressed.

20. FU: Fast up is used to reach tdc at high speed to minimize cycle time.

21. ST: Slow top is used for the last part of the stroke just before tdc.

22. TOP: Press here to programmable your top set point. After pressing, you can set by current position or by entering a distance in inches from tdc. Red position bar moves according to ram position.

23. BOTTOM: Press here to programmable your bottom set point. After pressing, you can set by current position or by entering a distance in inches from tdc. Red position bar moves according to ram position.

24. INDIVIDUAL STROKE LENGTH: This number is how many inches from tdc is each part of the stroke.

25. IPM \ INCH PER MINUTE: When IPM is displayed the speed of each part of the stroke will be displayed in IPM.

26. SPEED DISPLAY: This is where the speed for each part of the stroke is displayed.

27. PRESS MODE CHANGE POP UP: This message is a safety step the operator must take in order to change the mode of the press.

q.

Performance Monitor / Multi Point Edit Servo Hydraulic

PERFORMANCE MULTI-POINT (SCREEN 17.1)

PERFORMANCE MULTI-POINT

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. DISTANCE: Displays the distance in inches of each part of the stroke.

5. TIME: Displays the time in seconds of each part of the stroke.

6. TOTAL TIME: Displays total cycle time in seconds.

7. TOTAL DISTANCE: Displays total stroke length in inches.

8. SINGLE POINT PERFORMANCE: Press to go to single point performance page.

r.

Parts Counters / Batch Counters

COUNTER SCREEN (SCREEN 14)

Parts Counter Batch Counter

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press this button to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. UPDATE JOB: After you have set the counters best suited for the job, press save job button.

5. RETURN TO JOB MEMORY: Press blue hot key to return to job memory screen. Once there you can then go on to cams, tonnage & counter screen to complete your job set up and make final save. (follow instructions on job memory screen on the steps for setting up a new job)

6. ON PRESET 1: Toggle on / off or you can press "Reset to zero" to clear fields.

7. CURRENT: Displays the current count on your way to the desired preset value.

8. PRESET: Allows you to enter the desired value of parts to be run before press will stop at batch complete.

9. ON PRESET 2: Toggle on / off or you can press reset to zero to clear fields.

10. CURRENT: Displays the current count on your way to the desired preset value.

11. PRESET: Allows you to enter the desired value of parts to be run before press will stop at batch complete.

12. MAINTENANCE COUNTER SET VALVE: This is set by a supervisor with level 2 password on the maintenance & life counter screen.

13. MAINTENANCE COUNT DOWN: This shows the countdown which is also shown on the main run screen so operator has a head up before maintenance stop.

14. TOTAL LIFE COUNTER: This shows total life count of the press.

Note:

When count reaches 80% of it's value, the display will turn yellow. At 90% it'll turn red. This is so that the operator can be prepared for the machine to stop.

s.

Fault History

FAULT HISTORY (SCREEN 17)

fault history screen

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. SPM: Display current SPM/ stroke per minute setting.

5. MODE: Displays current position for mode of operation selector switch located at t-stand.

6. MOTOR DIRECTION: Display current direction of main motor, press will only operate in inch when in reverse.

7. AMP: Displays main motor amp draw.

8. SCROLL UP: Click here to scroll up.

9. SCROLL DOWN: Click here to scroll down.

10. CLEAR ALL: Click here to clear all faults. Unresolved faults will remain.

11. LEGEND: This legend is helpful for the operator to understand the different colors of the fault lines below.

12. FAULT DIAGNOSTICS: Press blue hot key will take you to fault diagnostics page, where you can find step by step troubleshooting guidance.

t.

Fault Diagnostics / Step X Step

FAULT DIAGNOSTICS / ON SCREEN TROUBLE SHOOTING (SCREEN 18)

FAULT DIAGNOSTICS / ON SCREEN TROUBLESHOOTING

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. FAULTS: Press this to go to fault history page

5. FAULT LIBRARY: Press this to go to fault library page

6. ACTIVE FAULTS: List of active faults (in most cases, pressing the reset button at the t-stand will clear each fault)

7. DIAGNOSTIC STEPS: Suggestions in sequence for trouble shooting cause of faults

8. FAULT CODE: Displays the fault code of the selected fault

9. FAULT NAME: Displays the name of selected fault

Note:

• In most cases, you can clear faults by pressing the ‘reset” button at the t-stand.

• Only a few faults require supervisor password. (overrun, dual valve reset, maintenance counter & re-zero encoder)

100+ Monitored Faults

SEE FAULT LIBRARY SUBJECT

u.

Fault Library / Fault Grouping

FAULT LIBRARY (SCREEN 19.1)

fault library page 1
fault library page 2
fault library page 3
fault library page 4
fault library page 5
fault library page 6
fault library page 7
fault library page 8
fault library page 9

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. FAULTS: Press here to go to fault history page.

5. FAULT DIAGNOSTICS: Press to go to fault diagnostics page.

6. FAULT GROUPS: Press each of the group names to view the faults in this group.

7. SCROLL UP: Press here to scroll up.

8. SCROLL DOWN: Press here to scroll down.‍

v.

QDC / Hydraulice Die Lifters

QUICK DIE CHANGE SCREEN AT TOP DEAD CENTER (SCREEN 20.1)

QUICK DIE CHANGE HYDRAULIC DIE LIFTERS

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. POSITION INDICATOR: Displays current slide position.

5. RAISE: Press to raise hydraulic die lifters, in order to remove/install tooling. **can only be operated at tdc.

6. LOWER: Press to lower hydraulic die lifters. **can only be operated at tdc.

w.

QDC / Quick Die Change

QUICK DIE CHANGE SCREEN AT BOTTOM DEAD CENTER (SCREEN 20.2)

QUICK DIE CHANGE

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, More or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. POSITION INDICATOR: Displays current slide position.

5. UPPER CLAMP- CLAMP: Press to energize upper clamps. **can only be pressed at bdc**

6. UPPER CLAMP - UNCLAMP: Press to de-energize upper clamps. **can only be pressed at bdc**

7. LOWER CLAMP - CLAMP: Press to energize lower clamps. **can only be pressed at bdc**

8. LOWER CLAMP - UNCLAMP: Press to de-energize lower clamps. **can only be pressed at bdc**

x.

Lubrication Grease Type

LUBRICATION PARAMETERS -GREASE- LEVEL 2 SUPERVISOR PASSWORD REQUIRED (SCREEN 23.1)

LUBRICATION PARAMETERS -GREASE-

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

Note: When your machine is set up at the factory, type of lube system, grease or recirculating oil is selected so you will only have access to adjust the lube system that fits your press. Only the active lube system will be displayed on the hmi screen.

Grease Lubrication System

4. GREASE PUMP: Press this to toggle on/off, when this is on, each time the press is started up, grease pump will make a full cycle. If presses are turned on/off a lot during a day, this should be in the off position. With system in off, grease pump will only cycle on a set number of stroke.

5. PRESET LUBE STROKE INTERVAL: Lubrication pump will turn on every # of strokes, this is your key setting point. Depending on speed, single stroke or continuous modes of operation you may need more or less lube. Watch the grease collection trays and grease on crankshaft, if you are getting excessive grease, increase the # of strokes, between lube intervals. A good starting point is 3000 strokes.

6. ACTUAL # OF STROKES UNTIL LUBE: Stroke countdown until lube pump is initiated.

7. DISTRIBUTOR BLOCK # OF PULSES: Distributor block has an electronically monitored cycle pin. Should the grease pump run low, this will detect lack of flow and show low grease on hmi screen.

8. PRIME: Press the yellow prime button to manually prime the lube system and the grease pump will run for the time set on #7.

y.

Lubrication Recirculating Oil Type

LUBRICATION PARAMETERS -RECIRCULATING OIL - LEVEL 2 PASSWORD REQUIRED (SCREEN 23.2)

LUBRICATION PARAMETERS -RECIRCULATING OIL

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

Note: When your machine is set up at the factory, type of lube system, grease or recirculating oil is selected so you will only have access to adjust the lube system that fits your press. Only the active lube system will be displayed on the hmi screen. (both lube systems are shown here for instructions only)

Recirculating Oil System (for larger straight side presses)

8. PUMP OFF/ON: Indicates current status of oil pump.

9. SUCTION FILTER: This will show green when operating correctly and red when filter is plugged & requires cleaning.

10. DISTRIBUTOR FILTER: This will show green when operating correctly and red when filter is plugged & requires cleaning.

11. DISTRIBUTOR BLOCK # OF PULSES / MIN: Refer to lubrication schematic for minimum setting for cycle pin at distributor block.

12. DISTRIBUTOR BLOCK # OF PULSES / MAX: Refer to lubrication schematic for maximum setting for cycle pin at distributor block.

13. ACTUAL PULSES / MIN: Displays actual number of pulses per minute.

14. MAIN TANK LEVEL: Main oil tank is equipped with a low level sensor, green is operational & red is low level & fault will show on hmi screen.

15. ACB LUBE ON EVERY # STROKES: You can set the # of strokes to activate acb / air counter balance oiler.

16. ACB PUMP TIMER SECONDS: You can set the # of seconds for the acb / air counter balance oiler to complete it's cycle.

z.

Light Curtain Safety Mute On Upstroke

SAFETY LIGHT CURTAINS - LEVEL 2 SUPERVISOR PASSWORD REQUIRED (SCREEN 24)

SAFETY LIGHT CURTAINS

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. LIGHT CURTAIN: Allows you to toggle between always on or mute on up stroke. Caution: when you re-zero encoder & actual slide position, you will get a warning screen warning you be to sure re-zero process is accurate. We encourage that you select light curtains always on during re-zero of encoder and then test the system before going back to mute on up stroke.

Note: Point of operation guards are the sole responsibility of the end user. Operators are to report any guards or light curtains that are not in good working order.

aa.

Maintenance Counter

MAINTENANCE & LIFE COUNTER SCREEN - LEVEL 2 SUPERVISOR PASSWORD REQUIRED (SCREEN 25.1)

MAINTENANCE & LIFE COUNTER SCREEN 1
MAINTENANCE & LIFE COUNTER SCREEN 2

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. MAINTENANCE CURRENT COUNT: Displays current count up to when perform maintenance stop will occur. This also shows on the lower right of main run screen and is shown with counter counting down to 0-zero so operator can see when maintenance stop is about to occur.

5. TOTAL STROKES: This is a total life counter.

6. PERFORM MAINTENANCE: Supervisor can preset number for maintenance stop. The press will stop after this preset number of strokes.

7. MAINT. RESET: Press to reset the maintenance counter.

8. SCROLL: Press to view suggested maintenance to optimize up time on your press.

ab.

Special Modes Of Operation

SAFETY LIGHT CURTAINS - LEVEL 2 SUPERVISOR PASSWORD REQUIRED (SCREEN 24)

SAFETY LIGHT CURTAINS

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. LIGHT CURTAIN: Allows you to toggle between always on or mute on up stroke. Caution: when you re-zero encoder & actual slide position, you will get a warning screen warning you be to sure re-zero process is accurate. We encourage that you select light curtains always on during re-zero of encoder and then test the system before going back to mute on up stroke.

Note: Point of operation guards are the sole responsibility of the end user. Operators are to report any guards or light curtains that are not in good working order.

ac.

Clutch Brake Valve Reset

DUAL VALVE RESET (SCREEN 29)

DUAL VALVE RESET

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. PRESS TO RESET: This will reset the DSV safety valve for clutch & brake.

Note:

• DSV valve and air systems must be properly maintained for optimum operation.

• Air tank and all press air supply lines should be drained weekly to remove any moisture build up.

• We encourage you to add collection lines & devices to keep press and area clean & collect any moisture or oil build up.

• Inspect and clean exhaust muffler on DSV valve, restricted air exhaust will reduce brake stopping time.

ad.

Overrun Reset

OVERRUN RESET (SCREEN 30)

OVERRUN RESET

Note:

**follow on screen instructions**

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. OVERRUN RESET: Press to start overrun reset sequence.

ae.

Re-Zero Encoder

RE-ZERO ENCODER - LEVEL 2 SUPERVISOR (SCREEN 31.1)

RE-ZERO ENCODER
RE-ZERO ENCODER 2

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. JOB: Press to go to “job memory” screen.

3. JOB NUMBER: Displays current 10 digit alphanumeric job that is selected.

4. RE-ZERO ENCODER: Press to re-calibrate encoder (once pressed a yellow warning screen will show to ensure safety). This calibrates the encoder at 180 degree.

5. ENCODER POSITION: Displays current encoder position in degrees.

6. RE-ZERO ENCODER: Press to re-calibrate encoder. Follow on screen instructions.

RE-ZERO ENCODER 3

af.

Feature Sets / Other Call Options

FEATURE SETS (SCREEN 35.1)

FEATURE SETS
FEATURE SETS 2

1. NAVIGATION BUTTON: Pressing this takes you to navigation screens. Depending on password level for operator or supervisor, more or less screens are accessible.

2. LOGOUT: This allows users to logout so other can login with their password level.

3. FEATURE SETS TOGGLE: This section allows a certified SP technician only to toggle feature sets on or off.

ag.

I-PRESS® Family of Controls

ADVANCED CONTROLS FOR EVERY APPLICATION

Sutherland Presses leading metal forming equipment manufacturer

I-KNOWv2.2.3 © 2021 SUTHERLAND PRESSES

SERVO HYDRAULIC PRESSES

a.

Four Post

FOUR POST SERVO HYDRAULIC PRESSES

four post sutherland presses hydraulic press

Our HP Series four post presses are available from 100 to 2000 ton. Single or multiple cylinders depending on die area size.

hp2-440 four post press

b.

Straight Side

STRAIGHT SIDE HYDRAULIC PRESSES

servo hydraulic press

Sutherland’s hydraulic presses are custom-built to deliver outstanding precision and reliable operation to a wide variety of applications. Our combination of active fluid management and advanced servo motors adjusts fluid volume and motor speed to match the workload required, optimizing press performance while greatly reducing energy consumption.

servo hydraulic press and contols

Our HD Series available from 100 to 500 ton in monoblock one piece frame depending on die area size. 200 to 3000 in Tie Rod multi piece frames. Cylinder configuration depends on die area size.

servo hydraulic press

c.

Tandem Line

TANDEM LINE HYDRAULIC PRESSES

Servo Hydraulic Tandem Line for Appliance Manufacturing

Multiple presses in a line for press to press automated or manual processing.

d.

Sample Layout Of Automated Straight Side

LAYOUT OF AUTOMATED STRAIGHT SIDE

hydraulic tandem line

SERVO HYDRAULIC TANDEM LINE

e.

Servo Hydraulic Advantage

SERVO HYDRAULICS / INTELLIGENT PRESSES

SERVO HYDRAULIC ADVANTAGES 1

Programmable motion profiles, manifold mounted dual safety valves limit piping and connections. Our fluid management system is designed for optimum function and ease of maintenance. Servo Hydraulic also reduces energy consumption unlike traditional hydraulic presses.

ADVANTAGES OF SERVO HYDRAULIC FLUID MANAGEMENT

servo hydraulic press fluid management

Designed with performance and maintenance in mind, our fluid management systems have limited piping, faster flow rates and quicker response times. Our manifolds are equipped with dual safety rated control valves and pressure testing ports for each valve. The I-PRESS® control has a page that shows a valve action chart in color for ease of maintenance.

servo hydraulic press fluid management diagram

I-PRESS® SERVO ENERGY SAVINGS

servo hydraulic press chart

f.

Controls & Safety

I-PRESS HYDRO®

SAFETY - CONNECTIVITY - FLEXIBILITY

Sutherland is proud to introduce I-PRESS®, the future of press control technology. With software based controls and touchscreen displays, I-PRESS® represents our commitment to leading the industry with the latest in controls innovation. The metal forming industry is evolving to a new level of connectivity and automation, and I-PRESS® has been designed to bring your press operations into the 21st century.

  • The world’s most intuitive press control
  • Full suite of safety features
  • Built for automation and expandability
  • Designed to integrate seamlessly with Connected Enterprise

I-PRESS CONTROLS YOUR PRESS ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD
ACCESS YOUR PRESS PRODUCTION FROM ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

I-PRESS HYDRO® is built for customization and expandability. When new features or modifications are needed, there are no costly chip replacements, just unlock your upgrades directly from the software.

• Full suite of automation tools
• Easy integration with feeders, robots, and transfer systems
• Customizable to support special applications

I-PRESS for servo hydraulic presses

I-PRESS HYDRO®

10” HD Color Touchscreen
Real Time Status Readouts
200 + Job Memory
12 Programmable Cams
16 Die Monitors
130 Separate Function Monitors
Step-by-Step Fault Diagnostics
Operator and Supervisor Access Levels
Performance Level D, Category 3 Safety Functions
Operator/ Maintenance Documentation Viewable via PDF
User Customizable PLC Access
Ethernet I/P Connectivity

DUAL CIRCUIT SAFETY / PL-D & CAT-3

servo hydraulic control management

Performance level (pl) d category 3 safety circuits, control reliable

• Dual circuit cross checking PLC's & safety I/O.

• Dual hydraulic solenoid valves. (servo hydraulic)

• Point of operator protection and or presence sensing light curtains.

• OSHA compliant designs, CSA & CE upon request.

• Fault monitoring on I-PRESS® screens. (safety-red or machine fault-yellow)

• Programmable maintenance stops & schedule on I-press screen.

• I/O trouble shooting on I-PRESS® screen.

• I-PRESS® can send faults or request assistance to “selected” mobile devices.

SAFETY CABINET FOR A TANDUM LINE PRESS
SAFETY CABINET FOR A TANDEM LINE PRESS

ON LINE I-PRESS TRAINING VIDEOS

To view our I-PRESS HYDRO® video training library, Click Here

g.

Advantages of I-PRESS® 4.0 Software

SERVO HYDRAULICS & I-PRESS® CONTROLS

ADVANTAGES OF I-PRESS SOFTWARE 4.0

Non Safety items in software can me made accessible to the end user. Changes and additions can be done by approved programmers. Our controls team can log into you press with your permission and make changes or add custom screens.

3 IN 1 MOBILE TRAINING CENTER MECHANICAL - FORGE - HYDRAULIC

servo hydraulic press training

h.

Ethernet Connections 4.0

ETHERNET CONNECTIONS 4.0

ETHERNET CONNECTIONS 4.0

With our option Balluff System, many items can be monitored such as: tanks levels, leak detection, oil flow and pressures, temperatures, positions, power supply, IO links  and air gap die to I-PRESS control.

IO-LINK MASTERS

IO-LINK MASTERS

NON-CONTACT INDUCTIVE COUPLING

NON-CONTACT INDUCTIVE COUPLING

i.

SAFETY SLIDE LOCKING SYSTEM

SAFETY SLIDE LOCKING SYSTEM

Safety Slide Locking System
Safety Slide Locking System

j.

I-PRESS® Condition Monitoring & Best Components

I-PRESS® CONDITIONS MONITOR

I-PRESS CONDITION MONITORING

Our I-PRESS® Servo Hydro press and automation control monitor every aspect of each press. We incorporate the highest quality components in our presses for reliability and ease of replacement components.

k.

Programmable Motion Profiles

SERVO HYDRAULICS & I-PRESS® CONTROLS

PROGRAMMABLE PROFILES TUTORIALS

Ability to change position, pressure and speed up to 7 times in one stroke.  Enjoy our training tutorial on I-PRESS® Servo Hydro press and automation controller.

l.

Fluid Management 4.0 Monitored

SERVO HYDRO FLUID MANAGEMENT

FLUID MANAGEMENT / 4.0 MONITORED
Photo of Hydraulic Press
NEW FLUID MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

NEW FLUID MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS: Designed with performance and maintenance in mind, our fluid management systems have limited piping, faster flow rates and quicker response times. Our manifolds are equipped with dual safety rated control valves and pressure testing ports for each valve. The I-PRESS® control has a screen that displays a valve action chart in color for ease of maintenance.

NEW FLUID MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

m.

Rear 3D View Of 400 Ton Straight Side

SERVO HYDRAULICS & I-PRESS® CONTROLS

REAR VIEW SERVO HYDRAULIC PRESS

n.

Hydraulic Punching Dampers For Blanking Operations

DAMPERS FOR PUNCH & BLANK OPERATIONS

DAMPERS FOR PUNCH & BLANK OPERATIONS

Blanking & Piercing operations can create reverse snap thru tonnage which will damage you press and tooling. With applications of this nature, hydraulic punching dampers can be added to reduce reverse snap thru tonnage. A good rule of thumb, if reverse tonnage is over 10% of press capacity, add dampers.

Reverse Tonnage - Part 1: Are You Beating Your Press to Death?

In this multipart topic on Reverse Tonnage also referred to as “Snap-Through” we will examine the root cause of this issue and its adverse effects on both your press and your tooling. The effects of Reverse Tonnage can be devastating. If not addressed properly over time Reverse Tonnage will literally reduce the life of your tooling and destroy the drive train of your press. The results of ignoring Reverse Tonnage can mean a complete rebuild of your press which can be hugely expensive.  However, today Reverse Tonnage is a well understood side effect of performing “blanking” in a press and its harmful effects can be controlled.

Snap-Through

Snap Through – What is it? Somewhere during the rotation cycle of your press prior to reaching bottom dead center your tooling engages the surface of your material.  As the rotation cycle progresses over the course of microseconds an immense amount of energy accumulates in the drive train of your press and the tooling itself. This is due to the resistance of the material to being pierced by your tooling. The stored energy accumulates until it reaches a point sufficient to overcome the resistance of the material.  Here in lies the problem. In an instant all that stored energy is released as the tooling pierces or “Snaps- Through” your material. This instantaneous and uncontrolled release of energy sends a shock wave through your entire press.  Also keep in mind the greater the area to be pierced or the thicker or higher strength your material is the greater amount of energy is stored and released.

Reverse Tonnage and Snap Through

Reverse Tonnage

Reverse Tonnage – What does it effect and why?  The Drive Train of your press is designed to deliver the working energy from the motor to the tooling in one direction – Forward. The Drive Train is comprised of several components: Gears, a Drive Shaft (Crank Shaft), Bushings, Tie Rod(s), and Ball Seat(s). In order to work properly all these components must have pre-engineered clearances.  This small amount of gap between the components allows the different metal surfaces of each component to slide along one another.

During “Snap Through” the clearances between the individual components will move abruptly and with great force from one side of their connection to the other.  For example the Tie Rod(s) are connected to the Crank Shaft(s) with a Bronze Bushing(s). The Bronze Bushing is perfectly round and it’s inside diameter is slightly greater than the outside diameter of the Crank Shaft.  During the downward stroke cycle when the working energy is being delivered to the tooling the bottom side of the Crank Shaft and the Bronze Bushing come into direct contact with each other.  All the clearance is driven to the top of the connection.  

Reverse Tonnage Stamping Press Diagram

This is the proper working cycle of the drive train. However, during “Snap-Through” the sudden release of the accumulated energy discussed earlier causes the Tie Rod(s) with the Bronze Bushing to lurch downward. When the Tie Rods lurch downward the Bronze Bushing slams into the topside of the Crank Shaft(s). The clearance in the connection point is reversed from the top of the connection to the bottom. Hence the term “Reverse Tonnage”. This same clearance reversal happens throughout the entire drive train. This sudden and uncontrolled release of energy sends a shock wave through your press and tooling. The drive train of your press must absorb the brute of this shock wave with every stroke. Over time, this uncontrolled release of energy will cause the round Bronze Bushing to become “Egg Shaped”. In addition the rest of the drive train will also have excessive wear and damage requiring in some cases a complete rebuild of the press.

In Part 2 of this series, we will examine ways to control Reverse Tonnage and its effects on your equipment.

Reverse Tonnage - Part 2: Know Your Limits

In the last section we examined the cause and effects of Snap Through and Reverse Tonnage. While Reverse Tonnage is a fact of life today it is well understood and it adverse effects can be controlled. In this issue we will examine how much Reverse Tonnage is acceptable. How Reverse Tonnage can be measured and the options available to you to address the effects of Reverse Tonnage.

Reverse Tonnage – How much is acceptable?

We all know Reverse Tonnage is a fact of life we must all deal with in metal forming. However, today's modern press designs take this in to account. Today's modern press designs can typically tolerate up to 10% of its total tonnage in Reverse Tonnage / capacity with no adverse effects.  For example if you have a 100 ton press it should be able to tolerate 10 tons of Reverse Tonnage with no ill effects on the press. This amount of Reverse Tonnage should be tolerable over the lifetime of the press. It is when a press routinely encounters Reverse Tonnage above this 10% margin that troubles begin.

How do I measure Reverse Tonnage?

Today there are advanced control systems available which can measure Reverse Tonnage for you and display it on a screen. These advanced systems utilize strain gauges attached to the frame of the press in various areas depending on the design of your press. These measurements are very accurate and the control system can provide you a readout of reverse tonnage with every stroke of the press in real time. Some of the most advanced control systems can also display the amount of working tonnage encountered by different areas on the press.  For example the display shown here from I-PRESS® is for a Mechanical Straight Side Press. The display shows Reverse Tonnage as well as the amount of tonnage exerted on the four corners of the press. The most advanced control systems will constantly monitor the amount of Reverse Tonnage the press encounters as well as monitor the amount of working tonnage exerted on the four corners of the press.  

Reverse Tonnage Monitor I-PRESS Control Sutherland Stamping Presses
Reverse Tonnage Tracking screen on the Sutherland I-PRESS® system

With these highly advanced systems you can set a high and low tonnage setting for each corner of the press. These control systems then monitor the tonnage and stop the press if the measured tonnage falls outside of your preset parameters. For example you may have slugs building up in your tooling so you will exceed the high setting or perhaps a punch has broken off in your tooling and low you will exceed your low tonnage setting. This type of constant and accurate monitoring can catch many problems as soon as they start. In turn allowing you to head off any additional problems that could be caused and address the issue at hand quickly for reduced down time.    

So now we know what Reverse Tonnage is. We know its cause and ill effects. We know how much is acceptable and how it can be measured. So what solutions are available to control Reverse Tonnage?

Double Point Gap C Frame Mechanical Stamping Press
The Sutherland Mark2

Press Size

You could consider over sizing your press based on the jobs you process. For instance if you had a 200 ton press processing jobs typically processed on a 100 ton press your 10% margin would be 20 tons instead of 10 tons. This is because the larger your press the more mass you have which can absorb the Reverse Tonnage.  While this is an option, it does not make a lot of economic sense and would be cost prohibitive.  There are other more economical ways to address Reverse Tonnage.  

Tooling

Your first line of defense against Reverse Tonnage is your tooling.  As mentioned in our last issue, you have the instantaneous effect of Snap Through and Reverse Tonnage.  However, with proper forethought and designing of your tooling Snap Through and Reverse Tonnage can be minimized. Consider if all the punches in your tooling are the same height. Punches are the elements of the tooling which pass completely through your material. When all the punches are the same height they will all Snap Through your material at the same instant. This tooling design places the greatest amount of Reverse Tonnage on your press as is possible with the job at hand. This is why it is always important to evaluate the design of your tooling.  As much as possible stagger the height of the punches in your tooling.

By staggering the height of the punches they complete their tasks in succession and not all Snap Through the material at the same instant. This minimizes Reverse Tonnage because, as one set of punches Snaps Through the material another set of punches are beginning to enter the material there by offsetting the Reverse Tonnage. This is a simple and very effective method of addressing Reverse Tonnage. However, it is many times over looked.  If staggering the height of the punches keeps your Reverse Tonnage under the 10% margin discussed earlier - Problem Solved.  

Hydraulic Shock Dampeners

When utilizing large complex tooling or sometimes due to the job at hand it may not always be possible to reduce Reverse Tonnage under the 10% margin discussed earlier.  In these situations your next line of defense are Hydraulic Shock Dampeners. These are separate self-contained hydraulic devices which work much like the shock absorbers on your car. Hydraulic Shock Dampeners are typically retrofittable onto both new and used presses. Hydraulic Shock Dampeners are always used in a set of 2, 4 or more depending on the size of your press.  When two are used they are placed on the right and left hand side of your press and centered front to back on the bolster. When four are used they are set on the four corners of the bolster.  

You must always use Hydraulic Shock Dampeners in sets of two to ensure the load is centered on your press. The dampeners height is adjustable so it can be set to come in contact with the presses slide at the same moment your tooling Snaps Through the material. The Hydraulic Shock Dampeners are designed to provide counter balance force against the slide to absorb the Reverse Tonnage energy at the moment the tooling Snaps Through the material there by greatly reducing Reverse Tonnage to very tolerable levels.

Hydraulic Shock Dampener for Stamping Presses
Hydraulic Shock Dampener

With these very desirable results why would you not always use Hydraulic Shock Dampeners? The only potential drawback is they take up precious real estate in your bolster area.  Sometimes due to the size of your tooling there is not enough room left on your bolster to use Hydraulic Shock Dampeners. However, some press manufacturers can offer innovative press designs where the Hydraulic Shock Dampeners are incorporated into the side frames of the press. This innovative design permanently eliminates the need to place the Hydraulic Shock Dampeners on the bolster. The novel design approach allows for all the benefits of the Hydraulic Shock Dampeners without giving up any precious bolster space.

In the end Reverse Tonnage is a fact of life we all have to deal with every day. However, its ill effects on your press and tooling are well understood.  As we have seen there are different ways to manage and control Reverse Tonnage depending on your circumstances.  Which method is best is really a team effort between you, your tool maker and your press supplier.  Just be sure to always address Reverse Tonnage so You are not Beating your Press to Death.

Reverse Tonnage - Part 3: Give Your Press a Lift

Your press in many ways is absolutely vital to the success of your business. The thump, thump, thump of your stamping press is the heart beat of your company. With every thump another part is made and your business prospers. To keep that heart beat strong your operators need to be sure to make the proper setups and adjustments on your stamping press as required for each job. The Air Counter Balance is one of the easiest adjustments to make on your press. Yet this very important system adjustment is many times over looked to the long term detriment of your mechanical press. If overlooked for too long the cumulative damage caused by not properly adjusting the Air Counter Balance (ACB) for each job can be so severe it can  require a complete rebuild of the drive train of your stamping press. This is a very costly repair that is easily avoided.

Mechanical Stamping Press Typical Counter Balance System

A typical Air Counter Balance System will incorporate an Air Cylinder(s), Air Regulator, Pressure Gauge, Air Dryer with Filter, System Decompression Valve, and a Compressed Air Tank (Reservoir) with Drain Plug and an Over Pressurization Relief Valve.  Depending on the size of your press the Air Counter Balance System will incorporate one or two Air Cylinders.  If there are two cylinders, one cylinder is located on each side of the press left and right. Compressed air to power the system is provided by an outside source.  

When in operation starting at Bottom Dead Center of the rotation cycle air from the air reservoir is pumped into the bottom of the air cylinder. The ram (picture right) of the air cylinder is connected to the upper slide of the press which also holds the upper die tooling. When in operation and adjusted properly a metered amount of compressed air fills the air cylinder at a specific pressure and rate. This in turn drives the cylinder ram upward at the same speed as the rotation cycle of the press. The Air Counter Balance System will lift the combined weight of the upper slide and the upper die tooling for the drive train of the press. Once the press has reached Top Dead Center the compressed air is released from the air cylinder(s) at a metered rate that will match rotation speed of the press.  This will keep back pressure against the upper slide and drive train. This keeps all the connections in the drive train in a (compressed) state.

Stamping Presses Air Counter Balance System Photo

Why does a Press need an Air Counter Balance System?

The rotation cycle of a mechanical press can be separated into two distinct halves: the Downward Stroke (Past TDC approaching Bottom Dead Center - Compression) and an Upward Stroke (Past BDC returning to Top Dead Center - Tension). All the connections in the drive train of your stamping press are designed with small clearances in them to allow the metal surfaces to slide passed each other. During the Downward Stroke of the rotation cycle the connections of the drive train press against one another in the same direction to move the tooling forward to complete its work. This drives all the small clearances to one side of all the connections throughout the entire drive train. Think of the drive train as being under compression pushing forward to deliver the working energy to the tooling. However, once the press has reached BDC and the Upward Stroke begins the workload now goes in reverse (Tension).    

During the Upward Stroke the drive train must lift or pull the Upper Slide along with the Upper Die Tooling to TDC. The amount of weight to be lifted can be significant. Now the drive train is under Tension.  All the forces in the drive train are reversed. Instead of pushing forward (compression) to deliver working energy to the tooling the drive train is now pulling (tension) to lift the upper slideand upper tooling. Without an Air Counter Balance this reversal in workload will cause all the small clearances in the connections of the drive train to instantaneously move to the other side of the connection.  

Over time without the Air Counter Balance being properly set will have the same devastating effect on the drive train as Reverse Tonnage. By allowing the constant uncontrolled reversing of the work load on the connections in the drive train with every stroke of the press will damage the connection points and will over time require a major rebuild of the drive train.  In short the Air Counter Balance will prevent the reversal of the workload keeping the drive train under compression there by preventing the engineered clearances in the drive train from moving back and forth.  

We now know what an Air Counter Balance System is, what the system does and why it is important to properly adjust this vital system for every job processed. In the next issue of Press On and Forge Ahead we will examine how to properly set the Air Counter Balance and proper maintenance of this system.

I-KNOWv2.2.3 © 2021 SUTHERLAND PRESSES

MECHANICAL PRESSES

a.

Double Point Tie Rod Straight Sides

DOUBLE POINT TIE ROD STRAIGHT SIDE

Sutherland presses mechanical press

From 220 to 2000 ton, Die Areas from 72" to 220" LR & 48" to 96" FB. The EHW series incorporates balanced eccentric drive with plunger guided connection points for vertical tonnage delivery. The SP2 series is a more conventional geared drive to crankshafts and connecting rod connection points.

Sutherland Presses Mechanical Press

b.

Double Point Monoblock One Piece Straight Side

DOUBLE POINT MONOBLOCK ONE PIECE STRAIGHT SIDE

Sutherland forge Presses in a factory

HDP from 121 to 330 ton, has 6 Point Slide Guides & up to 36" FB Die Area while CRS from 121 to 440 ton, has 8 Point Slide Guides & up to 48" FB Die Area. Both presses have front to back counter rotating drives and gears run in self contained oil bath for smooth operation.

Sutherland presses mechanical press
Sutherland Presses mechanical press

c.

Single Point Straight Side

SINGLE POINT STRAIGHT SIDE MECHANICAL PRESSES

mechanical press

From 100 to 1200 ton, Less frame deflection when compared to gap frames. Smaller Dies areas for concentrated loads. Available in one piece frame under 400 tons and tie rod frame over 400 ton.

Sutherland Presses Mechanical Press

d.

Gap Frame Double Point

GAP FRAME SINGLE POINT MECHANICAL PRESSES

gap frame mechanical press

From 66 to 350 ton, Economical, 3 Sides Open, Smaller Die Areas.

reliable gap frame mechanical press

e.

Gap Frame Single Point

GAP FRAME SINGLE POINT MECHANICAL PRESSES

gap frame mechanical press

From 66 to 350 ton, Economical, 3 Sides Open, Smaller Die Areas.

reliable gap frame mechanical press

f.

Sutherland Mechanical Advantages

ADVANTAGE SUTHERLAND

mechanical press control screen

I-PRESS® & AUTOMATION CONTROLS: All Sutherland mechanical presses come standard with our I-PRESS® & Automation control systems. For functionality and operator safety I-PRESS® is the most fully featured control system available today. I-PRESS® comes complete with Feature Sets and capabilities that are options at additional cost with other control builders.

mechanical press parts

ECCENTRIC PLUNGER GUIDED PRESSES: Our EHW Eccentric Heavy Wide Bed series is the most robust and accurate press available on the market. Double pitman design, with gears on center line vertical plunger guides that eliminate side thrust to slide.

mechanical press

GEARED CRANKSHAFT DRIVE STRAIGHT SIDE PRESSES: The SP SERIES straight side press line includes single point for small die areas, and double point for larger die areas. The back to front drive system reduces overall heights. Counter rotating main gears and connecting rods direct tonnage towards the center of the die area and reduce side thrust loads.

g.

Types Of Drive Systems In Double Point Straight Sides

THREE STYLES OF FRAME, DRIVE & CONNECTION POINT THAT DRIVE SLIDE IN RECIPROCATING MOTION

  • EHW ECCENTRIC
  • PLUNGER GUIDED
  • SUPER DUTY LOADS
EHW MECHANICAL PRESS
EHW MECHANICAL PRESS SLIDE

  • SP2 BACK TO FRONT DRIVE CRANK
  • STANDARD SPACED CON RODS
  • CONCENTRATE LOADS
SP2 MECHANICAL PRESS

SP2 MECHANICAL PRESS SLIDE

  • KS2 CENTER DRIVE CRANK
  • WIDE SPACED CON RODS
  • LARGE PANEL OR PROG DIE
KS2 MECHANICAL PRESS
KS2 MECHANICAL PRESS SLIDE

h.

Controls & Safety

DUAL CIRCUIT SAFETY / PL-D & CAT-3

mechanical press controls

I-PRESS & Automation controls are designed for safety and each of use and navigation. Safety levels are PL-D & Cat-3.

i.

AIR SYSTEMS

AIR SYSTEMS

I-KNOW Interactive_Knowledge Base

Library currently being updated ...

j.

Lubrication Systems

LUBRICATION SYSTEMS

I-KNOW Interactive_Knowledge Base

Library currently being updated ...

k.

ACB / Air Counter Balance Systems

ACB / AIR COUNTER BALANCE SYSTEMS

Fundamentals & Importance

Air Counter-Balance Systems are a crucial part to mechanical presses. If any part of the air system is leaking or not functioning properly, it should be reported to maintenance supervisor immediately.

All presses should be equipped with an ACB pressure gauge, adjustment regulator and a graph chart that indicates air pressure required to upper die weight. Each time a new die is loaded the ACB pressure should be reset. Good practice is to mark upper die to show correct measured weight.

Failure to make sure ACB system is set to correct pressures will result in major damage to other parts of the press drive system (see #4 connection points).

√ ACB Systems are the most overlooked & improperly used systems on stamping presses.
√ Never open ACB cylinders unless all air is drained from press and apply lock out / tag out rules.
√ Understand the difference of static load (slide not moving) and dynamic load (slide moving) to set proper ACB pressure. Faster strokes per minute will require increase in air pressure to account for the mass / weight and speed of slide. If your press is equipped with a main motor AMP draw indicator, this is the best way to assure proper ACB pressures for the speed you are running the press. Too much pressure = AMP increase on down stroke, Too little pressure = AMP increase on up stroke.
√ Properly set ACB pressure allows good lubrication flow to all bearings and bushings in the drive.
√ Too low pressure will cause a jack hammer effect on all bearings, bushings and drive gears.
√ Maintenance should be sure to drain ACB air supply tank weekly to remove any moisture.
√ Inspect lubrication to ACB cylinders to make sure seals and packings are properly lubricated.
√ Inspect ACB rods that connect cylinders to slide and make sure no scoring marks are present.

Visit Here for more ACB Tips.

ACB system mechanical press
Sample slide, upper die weight & ACB air center
Sample slide, upper die weight & ACB air center
Sample slide, upper die weight & ACB air center

l.

HOLP / Hydraulic Overload Protections

HOLP / HYDRAULIC OVERLOAD PROTECTIONS

Fundamentals & Importance

Most presses today come equipped with a HOLP (hydraulic overload protection) system that serves two purposes, to free stuck dies near BDC / Bottom Dead Center and to protect the press drive system. Most HOLP system are set to release pressure and stop the press when 110% of press capacity is reached.

√ In most cases, HOLP systems are air over hydraulic systems which consist of a Keyed HOLP Release switch to solenoid mounted on the HOLP pump, a HOLP pump, pressure gage, regulator and hydraulic tank with site gage which feed a pressurized piston under each suspension point in the slide. See “h” on diagram on next page.
√ Never overfill the HOLP tank, when system is pressurized and press in ready to run condition, the oil level should be at the mid-point on the site gage. When the HOLP is activated in release pressure the oil under the suspension points in slide needs to evacuate which will raise the tank level closer to full.
√ Never change pressure setting from factory recommended setting. Changing this pressure setting will cause damage to the press.
√ It is suggested to operate the HOLP system once a week to confirm proper function. A good way to do this is to put a dial indicator between bolster and slide, turn-key to release position and measure the upward travel of the slide. Note: ACB Air Counter-Balance pressure may need to be turned up to overcome the slide and tooling weight.

Visit here for free Press Terminology document.

Sample Air Schematic

Sample HOLP / hydraulic overload systems

Sample HOLP / hydraulic overload systems

m.

Rigid Frames

BED ASSEMBLY / LOW DEFLECTION

mechanical press rigid frame

Frames are designed to increase press strength, reduce frame deflection which in turn increases die life between sharpening's.

n.

Hydraulic Punching Dampers For Blanking Operations

DAMPERS FOR PUNCH & BLANK OPERATIONS

DAMPERS FOR PUNCH & BLANK OPERATIONS

Blanking & Piercing operations can create reverse snap thru tonnage which will damage you press and tooling. With applications of this nature, hydraulic punching dampers can be added to reduce reverse snap thru tonnage. A good rule of thumb, if reverse tonnage is over 10% of press capacity, add dampers.

Reverse Tonnage - Part 1: Are You Beating Your Press to Death?

In this multipart topic on Reverse Tonnage also referred to as “Snap-Through” we will examine the root cause of this issue and its adverse effects on both your press and your tooling. The effects of Reverse Tonnage can be devastating. If not addressed properly over time Reverse Tonnage will literally reduce the life of your tooling and destroy the drive train of your press. The results of ignoring Reverse Tonnage can mean a complete rebuild of your press which can be hugely expensive.  However, today Reverse Tonnage is a well understood side effect of performing “blanking” in a press and its harmful effects can be controlled.

Snap-Through

Snap Through – What is it? Somewhere during the rotation cycle of your press prior to reaching bottom dead center your tooling engages the surface of your material.  As the rotation cycle progresses over the course of microseconds an immense amount of energy accumulates in the drive train of your press and the tooling itself. This is due to the resistance of the material to being pierced by your tooling. The stored energy accumulates until it reaches a point sufficient to overcome the resistance of the material.  Here in lies the problem. In an instant all that stored energy is released as the tooling pierces or “Snaps- Through” your material. This instantaneous and uncontrolled release of energy sends a shock wave through your entire press.  Also keep in mind the greater the area to be pierced or the thicker or higher strength your material is the greater amount of energy is stored and released.

Reverse Tonnage and Snap Through

Reverse Tonnage

Reverse Tonnage – What does it effect and why?  The Drive Train of your press is designed to deliver the working energy from the motor to the tooling in one direction – Forward. The Drive Train is comprised of several components: Gears, a Drive Shaft (Crank Shaft), Bushings, Tie Rod(s), and Ball Seat(s). In order to work properly all these components must have pre-engineered clearances.  This small amount of gap between the components allows the different metal surfaces of each component to slide along one another.

During “Snap Through” the clearances between the individual components will move abruptly and with great force from one side of their connection to the other.  For example the Tie Rod(s) are connected to the Crank Shaft(s) with a Bronze Bushing(s). The Bronze Bushing is perfectly round and it’s inside diameter is slightly greater than the outside diameter of the Crank Shaft.  During the downward stroke cycle when the working energy is being delivered to the tooling the bottom side of the Crank Shaft and the Bronze Bushing come into direct contact with each other.  All the clearance is driven to the top of the connection.  

Reverse Tonnage Stamping Press Diagram

This is the proper working cycle of the drive train. However, during “Snap-Through” the sudden release of the accumulated energy discussed earlier causes the Tie Rod(s) with the Bronze Bushing to lurch downward. When the Tie Rods lurch downward the Bronze Bushing slams into the topside of the Crank Shaft(s). The clearance in the connection point is reversed from the top of the connection to the bottom. Hence the term “Reverse Tonnage”. This same clearance reversal happens throughout the entire drive train. This sudden and uncontrolled release of energy sends a shock wave through your press and tooling. The drive train of your press must absorb the brute of this shock wave with every stroke. Over time, this uncontrolled release of energy will cause the round Bronze Bushing to become “Egg Shaped”. In addition the rest of the drive train will also have excessive wear and damage requiring in some cases a complete rebuild of the press.

In Part 2 of this series, we will examine ways to control Reverse Tonnage and its effects on your equipment.

Reverse Tonnage - Part 2: Know Your Limits

In the last section we examined the cause and effects of Snap Through and Reverse Tonnage. While Reverse Tonnage is a fact of life today it is well understood and it adverse effects can be controlled. In this issue we will examine how much Reverse Tonnage is acceptable. How Reverse Tonnage can be measured and the options available to you to address the effects of Reverse Tonnage.

Reverse Tonnage – How much is acceptable?

We all know Reverse Tonnage is a fact of life we must all deal with in metal forming. However, today's modern press designs take this in to account. Today's modern press designs can typically tolerate up to 10% of its total tonnage in Reverse Tonnage / capacity with no adverse effects.  For example if you have a 100 ton press it should be able to tolerate 10 tons of Reverse Tonnage with no ill effects on the press. This amount of Reverse Tonnage should be tolerable over the lifetime of the press. It is when a press routinely encounters Reverse Tonnage above this 10% margin that troubles begin.

How do I measure Reverse Tonnage?

Today there are advanced control systems available which can measure Reverse Tonnage for you and display it on a screen. These advanced systems utilize strain gauges attached to the frame of the press in various areas depending on the design of your press. These measurements are very accurate and the control system can provide you a readout of reverse tonnage with every stroke of the press in real time. Some of the most advanced control systems can also display the amount of working tonnage encountered by different areas on the press.  For example the display shown here from I-PRESS® is for a Mechanical Straight Side Press. The display shows Reverse Tonnage as well as the amount of tonnage exerted on the four corners of the press. The most advanced control systems will constantly monitor the amount of Reverse Tonnage the press encounters as well as monitor the amount of working tonnage exerted on the four corners of the press.  

Reverse Tonnage Monitor I-PRESS Control Sutherland Stamping Presses
Reverse Tonnage Tracking screen on the Sutherland I-PRESS® system

With these highly advanced systems you can set a high and low tonnage setting for each corner of the press. These control systems then monitor the tonnage and stop the press if the measured tonnage falls outside of your preset parameters. For example you may have slugs building up in your tooling so you will exceed the high setting or perhaps a punch has broken off in your tooling and low you will exceed your low tonnage setting. This type of constant and accurate monitoring can catch many problems as soon as they start. In turn allowing you to head off any additional problems that could be caused and address the issue at hand quickly for reduced down time.    

So now we know what Reverse Tonnage is. We know its cause and ill effects. We know how much is acceptable and how it can be measured. So what solutions are available to control Reverse Tonnage?

Double Point Gap C Frame Mechanical Stamping Press
The Sutherland Mark2

Press Size

You could consider over sizing your press based on the jobs you process. For instance if you had a 200 ton press processing jobs typically processed on a 100 ton press your 10% margin would be 20 tons instead of 10 tons. This is because the larger your press the more mass you have which can absorb the Reverse Tonnage.  While this is an option, it does not make a lot of economic sense and would be cost prohibitive.  There are other more economical ways to address Reverse Tonnage.  

Tooling

Your first line of defense against Reverse Tonnage is your tooling.  As mentioned in our last issue, you have the instantaneous effect of Snap Through and Reverse Tonnage.  However, with proper forethought and designing of your tooling Snap Through and Reverse Tonnage can be minimized. Consider if all the punches in your tooling are the same height. Punches are the elements of the tooling which pass completely through your material. When all the punches are the same height they will all Snap Through your material at the same instant. This tooling design places the greatest amount of Reverse Tonnage on your press as is possible with the job at hand. This is why it is always important to evaluate the design of your tooling.  As much as possible stagger the height of the punches in your tooling.

By staggering the height of the punches they complete their tasks in succession and not all Snap Through the material at the same instant. This minimizes Reverse Tonnage because, as one set of punches Snaps Through the material another set of punches are beginning to enter the material there by offsetting the Reverse Tonnage. This is a simple and very effective method of addressing Reverse Tonnage. However, it is many times over looked.  If staggering the height of the punches keeps your Reverse Tonnage under the 10% margin discussed earlier - Problem Solved.  

Hydraulic Shock Dampeners

When utilizing large complex tooling or sometimes due to the job at hand it may not always be possible to reduce Reverse Tonnage under the 10% margin discussed earlier.  In these situations your next line of defense are Hydraulic Shock Dampeners. These are separate self-contained hydraulic devices which work much like the shock absorbers on your car. Hydraulic Shock Dampeners are typically retrofittable onto both new and used presses. Hydraulic Shock Dampeners are always used in a set of 2, 4 or more depending on the size of your press.  When two are used they are placed on the right and left hand side of your press and centered front to back on the bolster. When four are used they are set on the four corners of the bolster.  

You must always use Hydraulic Shock Dampeners in sets of two to ensure the load is centered on your press. The dampeners height is adjustable so it can be set to come in contact with the presses slide at the same moment your tooling Snaps Through the material. The Hydraulic Shock Dampeners are designed to provide counter balance force against the slide to absorb the Reverse Tonnage energy at the moment the tooling Snaps Through the material there by greatly reducing Reverse Tonnage to very tolerable levels.

Hydraulic Shock Dampener for Stamping Presses
Hydraulic Shock Dampener

With these very desirable results why would you not always use Hydraulic Shock Dampeners? The only potential drawback is they take up precious real estate in your bolster area.  Sometimes due to the size of your tooling there is not enough room left on your bolster to use Hydraulic Shock Dampeners. However, some press manufacturers can offer innovative press designs where the Hydraulic Shock Dampeners are incorporated into the side frames of the press. This innovative design permanently eliminates the need to place the Hydraulic Shock Dampeners on the bolster. The novel design approach allows for all the benefits of the Hydraulic Shock Dampeners without giving up any precious bolster space.

In the end Reverse Tonnage is a fact of life we all have to deal with every day. However, its ill effects on your press and tooling are well understood.  As we have seen there are different ways to manage and control Reverse Tonnage depending on your circumstances.  Which method is best is really a team effort between you, your tool maker and your press supplier.  Just be sure to always address Reverse Tonnage so You are not Beating your Press to Death.

Reverse Tonnage - Part 3: Give Your Press a Lift

Your press in many ways is absolutely vital to the success of your business. The thump, thump, thump of your stamping press is the heart beat of your company. With every thump another part is made and your business prospers. To keep that heart beat strong your operators need to be sure to make the proper setups and adjustments on your stamping press as required for each job. The Air Counter Balance is one of the easiest adjustments to make on your press. Yet this very important system adjustment is many times over looked to the long term detriment of your mechanical press. If overlooked for too long the cumulative damage caused by not properly adjusting the Air Counter Balance (ACB) for each job can be so severe it can  require a complete rebuild of the drive train of your stamping press. This is a very costly repair that is easily avoided.

Mechanical Stamping Press Typical Counter Balance System

A typical Air Counter Balance System will incorporate an Air Cylinder(s), Air Regulator, Pressure Gauge, Air Dryer with Filter, System Decompression Valve, and a Compressed Air Tank (Reservoir) with Drain Plug and an Over Pressurization Relief Valve.  Depending on the size of your press the Air Counter Balance System will incorporate one or two Air Cylinders.  If there are two cylinders, one cylinder is located on each side of the press left and right. Compressed air to power the system is provided by an outside source.  

When in operation starting at Bottom Dead Center of the rotation cycle air from the air reservoir is pumped into the bottom of the air cylinder. The ram (picture right) of the air cylinder is connected to the upper slide of the press which also holds the upper die tooling. When in operation and adjusted properly a metered amount of compressed air fills the air cylinder at a specific pressure and rate. This in turn drives the cylinder ram upward at the same speed as the rotation cycle of the press. The Air Counter Balance System will lift the combined weight of the upper slide and the upper die tooling for the drive train of the press. Once the press has reached Top Dead Center the compressed air is released from the air cylinder(s) at a metered rate that will match rotation speed of the press.  This will keep back pressure against the upper slide and drive train. This keeps all the connections in the drive train in a (compressed) state.

Stamping Presses Air Counter Balance System Photo

Why does a Press need an Air Counter Balance System?

The rotation cycle of a mechanical press can be separated into two distinct halves: the Downward Stroke (Past TDC approaching Bottom Dead Center - Compression) and an Upward Stroke (Past BDC returning to Top Dead Center - Tension). All the connections in the drive train of your stamping press are designed with small clearances in them to allow the metal surfaces to slide passed each other. During the Downward Stroke of the rotation cycle the connections of the drive train press against one another in the same direction to move the tooling forward to complete its work. This drives all the small clearances to one side of all the connections throughout the entire drive train. Think of the drive train as being under compression pushing forward to deliver the working energy to the tooling. However, once the press has reached BDC and the Upward Stroke begins the workload now goes in reverse (Tension).    

During the Upward Stroke the drive train must lift or pull the Upper Slide along with the Upper Die Tooling to TDC. The amount of weight to be lifted can be significant. Now the drive train is under Tension.  All the forces in the drive train are reversed. Instead of pushing forward (compression) to deliver working energy to the tooling the drive train is now pulling (tension) to lift the upper slideand upper tooling. Without an Air Counter Balance this reversal in workload will cause all the small clearances in the connections of the drive train to instantaneously move to the other side of the connection.  

Over time without the Air Counter Balance being properly set will have the same devastating effect on the drive train as Reverse Tonnage. By allowing the constant uncontrolled reversing of the work load on the connections in the drive train with every stroke of the press will damage the connection points and will over time require a major rebuild of the drive train.  In short the Air Counter Balance will prevent the reversal of the workload keeping the drive train under compression there by preventing the engineered clearances in the drive train from moving back and forth.  

We now know what an Air Counter Balance System is, what the system does and why it is important to properly adjust this vital system for every job processed. In the next issue of Press On and Forge Ahead we will examine how to properly set the Air Counter Balance and proper maintenance of this system.

I-KNOWv2.2.3 © 2021 SUTHERLAND PRESSES

FORGE PRESSES

a.

Hot Forge New Technology

NEW TECHNOLOGY

Sutherland Presses forge press technology

Monoblock one piece frames from 400 to 1000 & Tie Rod frames from 1300 to 4400  ton. The heaviest forge press available, with hydraulic un-sticking device & motorized slide adjustment. Stand alone presses or full automatic with servo drive transfer systems.

forge press cutaway

WARM & HOT FORGE

SUTHERLAND PRESSES HOT AND WARM FORGE PRESS TECHNOLOGY

b.

Cold Forge

COLD FORGE

Forge presses

Monoblock one piece frames from 440 to 1200 ton. Link Drive Knuckle Joint is ideal for cold forging and coining operations. Stand alone presses or fully automated.

c.

Cored Forge

CORED FORGE

Cord forge press

Available from 440 to 1200 ton. LSP series is equipped with long stroke which allows time for the lower hydraulic core pin actuator to do its work. Cored Forging saves material and reduces secondary operations.

e.

Hot Heading

HOT HEADING

forge hot heading press

Available from 88 to 1200 ton for hot heading. Our FLST / Front Loading Sliding Table permits faster load times, less heat loss for heading of long bolts and improves operator ergonomics.

hot heading forge press

e.

Hydraulic Forging

HYDRAULIC FORGING

Hydraulic Forging Press

Available from 200 to 3000 ton in single cylinder design. Both conventional and servo driven fluid management systems are available. With Servo you have the ability to program motion profiles to adjust position, speeds and pressures up to 7 times in one stroke.

f.

Trim Presses

TRIM PRESSES

men working with a forge press

Available from 100 to 300 ton in Gap Frame & 100 to 1000 ton in straight side. Simple controls and heat shield packages to protect press are standard.

KC forge press

g.

Servo Drive Transfer & Robots / Automation

ROBOTS AND TRANSFER

We offer stand along forge presses or fully automated systems. Depending on parts and application, servo driven transfer systems or robots with multi-station grippers.

forge press robot transfer systems

h.

Die Set Holders With QDC / Quick Die Change

QUICK DIE CHANGE

forge press die

Massive post guided die set holders for single station or multi-station. Comes with hydraulic clamps for quick die changes. Available in round, square or rectangular die set cassettes.

i.

Preform Rolling Machines

PREFORM ROLLING MACHINES

forge press rolling machine

Depending on parts to be made, we offer preform rolling machines to preform billets into proper shape before forging.

forge press rolling machine

I-KNOWv2.2.3 © 2021 SUTHERLAND PRESSES

I-BUILD INTERACTIVE PRESS BUILDER

SERVO-HYDRAULIC

a.

HD2

b.

HP1

MECHANICAL

a.

EHW

I-KNOWv2.2.3 © 2021 SUTHERLAND PRESSES